Mississippi Valley State University

October 1, 2014

History (HI)

HI 101. WORLD HISTORY TO 1500. Political, cultural, social and economic development of human societies from the prehistoric period to 1500, emphasizing commonalities as well as diversity. Major topics include origins of agriculture and consequent development of eastern and western hemisphere civilizations; ancient empires; rise of Islam; Christian European political development and the Renaissance; Mongol expansion and decline; tropical African state systems, external trade and local society organization. (3)

HI 102. WORLD HISTORY AFTER 1500. Development of human societies from 1500 to the present. Major topics include the maritime revolution and European transformations; industrial revolution; Asian empires and trade; the “new imperialism”; world wars, the cold war in a global context, decolonization, globalization and an increasingly interdependent world. (3)

 

HI 201. EARLY U. S. HISTORY. A survey of United States history from the earliest European settlements in North America through the end of Reconstruction (1877). Emphasizes U.S. political, economic, and social development, the evolution of its institutions, and the causes and consequences of its principal wars. (3)

 

HI 202. MODERN U.S. HISTORY. A survey of history of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to modern times. Emphasis is placed on internal expansion, isolationism, and U.S. emergence as a world power. (3)

 

HI 301. HISTORY OF ENGLAND, GREAT BRITAIN AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE. Political, social and cultural history of England from Roman times through its rise to become colonial master of a world-wide empire in Africa, Asia, Australia, and North America. Special emphasis is given to Britain’s impact on the people of Asia and Africa. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102. (3)

 

HI 309. U.S. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY. A study of U.S. diplomatic history and principles; The Revolution; Early U.S. policies on isolation and expansion; The War of 1812; The Monroe Doctrine; Manifest Destiny; The Civil War; American imperialism and the Spanish-American War; U.S. diplomacy toward Latin America in the 20th century; World War I; attempts to preclude further war; World War II; Cold War; and Contemporary problems. (3)

 

HI 315. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY. This course examines the African American experience in the United States from slavery to the present era. Students study the chronology of black history, the African heritage, the crucible of slavery, the struggle for equality, Pan-Africanism, and the development and evolution of the African American community.(3)

 

HI 320. 20TH CENTURY U.S. Major developments in American history from the Populist and Progressive Eras to the present. Prerequisites: HI 201 and HI 202. (3)

 

HI 330. COLONIAL AMERICA. Analysis of European discovery and colonization of the Americas, particularly North America. Attention is given to European exploration, interaction with Native American cultures, and the beginnings of colonial development to the end of the Revolution and U.S. independence. (3)

 

HI 331. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH. Political, social, economic, and cultural aspects of the history of the U.S. South. Reconstruction, race, class, and gender relations; economic change; and the role of the South in the nation are explored. (3)

 

HI 350. SLAVERY AND FREEDOM. The causes and consequences of the Civil War, slavery, sectionalism, the Civil War, Reconstruction and Redemption. Prerequisites: HI 201 and HI 202. (3)

 

HI 361. AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY. The development of American constitutional principles and practices, focusing on federalism, the separation of powers, and the Bill of Rights. Prerequisites: HI 201, HI 202 and PS 201. (3)

 

HI 382. THE COLD WAR. U.S.-Soviet rivalry from the end of World War II to the fall USSR. Impact of Cold War tensions on nonaligned nations is also considered. (3)

 

HI 387. SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA. General survey of African historical themes south of the Sahara. Early state systems, interior and exterior trade, development of the trans-Atlantic, trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean trading systems, European colonial rule and African nationalism leading to political independence are discussed. Discussions of current issues of the continent are dealt with in their relation to the historical background. (3)

 

HI 389. LATIN AMERICAN/CARIBBEAN HISTORY. This course provides a social and cultural survey from the Colonial period to Independence. It also examines the Early National period. Prerequisites: HI 201 and HI 202. (3)

 

HI 400. TOPICS IN UNITED STATES HISTORY. Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics in United States history with a specific theme indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. May be repeated for credit as long as different topics are selected. Will count as an HI elective for history majors, but may not be substituted for prescribed courses in the degree program. Prerequisites: HI 201 and HI 202. (3)

 

HI 401. TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY. Introductory exploration and analysis of selected topics in history outside the United States with specific theme or world region indicated by course title listed in college course schedule. May be repeated for credit as long as different topics are selected. Will count as an HI elective for history majors, but may not be substituted for prescribed courses in the degree program. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102. (3)

 

HI 422. U.S. MILITARY HISTORY. U.S. military history from the Revolution to the present. Evaluation of significant battles from the viewpoints of the participants, their resources, decision-making techniques, and the nine principles of war. All U.S. wars are examined. (3)

 

HI 432. HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. Survey of Mississippi history. Emphasis is placed on first civilizations, early statehood, the Civil War/Reconstruction, Mississippi in the Great Depression, and the Civil Rights era. (3)

 

HI 490. HISTORY RESEARCH SEMINAR. Seminar on historiography and the fundamentals of historical research and writing. Students are guided through the stages of preparation of a scholarly research paper, using written, oral, and other primary sources, as well as, scholarly secondary sources. (3)